About SIGNAL Journal

SIGNAL Journal is the peer-reviewed (refereed) journal of the International Reading Association's Special Interest Group - Network on Adolescent Literature. The journal publishes articles, essays, and reviews about varying aspects of young adult literature (YAL), as well as interviews with YAL authors.

Submission Requirements

Manuscripts, which may be 4-15 pages in length, should be double-spaced and follow APA documentation style. NOTE: Please italicize book titles, but not series titles. Series titles should be capitalized but not italicized or placed in quotation marks. Please also submit manuscripts as Word documents, attaching tables, charts, and photos (.jpg or .gif) in a separate file.

We do not accept simultaneous submissions. Manuscripts should be submitted electronically to  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.   Please include a short biographical sketch, including the name of your school and position. The editors reserve the right to modify manuscripts to fit length and language considerations. SIGNAL Journal requires that articles have not been published elsewhere.

Review Process

Each manuscript will receive a blind review by at least two members of the review board, unless the content or length makes it inappropriate for the journal. The review board will make a decision within four to six weeks of receiving manuscripts. Any revisions of manuscripts submitted for further review will also receive a blind review by at least two members of the review board. The review board will make a decision within four to six weeks of receiving the revised manuscript. 

If you have questions or if you're interested in being added to SIGNAL's e-mail list, please send an e-mail to  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  or click here for membership information.

 

Call for Manuscripts: Spring/Summer 2015

Theme: Critical Conversations About YA Literature

Deadline: February 1, 2015

The shooting of Michael Brown by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri this past summer served to remind us of the racial and class inequities that many Americans confront in the twenty-first century. In the wake of Ferguson, some educators took to social media sites such as Twitter and advocated engaging secondary and college students in critical conversations about race, class, gender, and so on. Describing the shape that such conversations might take, Charles Blow, writing for the New York Times, argues, “Experiences must be explored. Histories and systems must be laid bare. Biases, fears, stereotype and mistrust must be examined. Personal — as well as societal and cultural — responsibility must be taken.” Although Young Adult literature represents a vehicle that teachers and students can put toward these ends, it also participates in the ideological manipulation of readers. As such, it is important that readers approach it critically.

This issue of SIGNAL Journal is devoted to exploring the intersections between Young Adult literature, identity politics, and critical literacy. How do you create opportunities for secondary or college students to read Young Adult literature critically? How do you support them in applying literary theories to identify and interrogate oppressive ideologies? What opportunities do you create for students to interact with books written by diverse authors about diverse characters? What can critical readings of individual Young Adult novels reveal about the ideological positions they invite readers to embrace? How do specific texts resist or subvert dominant ideologies? What challenges might educators interested in engaging students in critical conversations about YA literature expect to face? In short, to paraphrase Walter Dean Myers, what opportunities do you create for all students to recognize themselves in stories, validate their existence as human beings, and acknowledge their value? Theoretical as well as practitioner-oriented submissions are encouraged.